International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies

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Articles that appear in the Trauma Blog are from StressPoints or web editorial contributions.

StressPoints is the award-winning online eNewsletter of ISTSS. StressPoints shares news and opinions about traumatic stress, highlights ISTSS and affiliate societies' activities and offers informational resources and feature articles of interest to the field. Access archived StressPoints articles prior to 2015.

Stability and Change in Posttraumatic distress: A 7 Year Follow–up Study of Mothers and Young Children Exposed to Cumulative Trauma

Posted 17 April 2017 in JOTS Highlights by Ruth Pat-Horenczyk, PhD & Sophie Brickman, BA

What are the new insights on resilience of children and families living under continual threat?
Resilience has been coined as “ordinary magic” (Masten, 2001), but the age-old question remains as to why some people bounce back in the face of trauma, while others experience debilitating distress. 

Treating Veterans with PTSD and Borderline Personality Symptoms

Posted 12 April 2017 in JOTS Highlights by Laura Meyers, PhD, ABPP

The DBTPE Journeys program is a novel 12-week intensive outpatient program that combines Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Prolonged Exposure (PE), and community integration outings to treat co-morbid PTSD and Borderline Personality Disorder. 

What determines posttraumatic stress and growth following various traumatic events?: A study in a Turkish community sample

Posted 12 April 2017 in JOTS Highlights by Ervin Gul & Nuray Karanci

Experiencing traumatic life events, such as natural disasters, accidents, life-threatening illnesses, torture, sexual and/or physical violence, unexpected death of loved ones, terrorist attacks, and many more, are unfortunately quite prevalent in the lifetime of adults. 

For Whom Does Time Heal Wounds?

Posted 11 April 2017 in JOTS Highlights by Marianne Skogbrott Birkeland, PhD

Why do two people who experience the same trauma react completely differently? Specifically; Who recovers spontaneously from trauma, and who develops lasting symptoms of posttraumatic stress? 

The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory: A Revision of Integrating Existential and Spiritual Change

Posted 11 April 2017 in JOTS Highlights by Richard Tedeschi, PhD et al.

Over years, the PTGI has been extensively used in studies conducted with people living in different cultures. The scale has five factors: relating to others, new possibilities, personal strength, appreciation of others and spiritual change. Of the five factors of the PTGI, perhaps the one that has been questioned most often is the Spiritual Change (SC) factor since it includes only two items, and these have a spiritual or religious aspect, but they do not capture growth that may be considered more existential in nature. 

What determines posttraumatic stress and growth following various traumatic events? A study in a Turkish community sample

Posted 28 January 2017 in JOTS Highlights by Ervin Gül, PhD & A. Nuray Karanci, PhD

Experiencing traumatic life events, such as natural disasters, accidents, life-threatening illnesses, torture, sexual and/or physical violence, unexpected death of loved ones, terrorist attacks, and many more, are unfortunately quite prevalent in the lifetime of adults. Every experience seems to be a different story, the story being shaped by the individuals’ history, characteristics and the how they cope with the event and the meaning they give to the event. Thus, the psychological consequences of these events may be dissimilar for everyone. 

For Whom Does Time Heal Wounds?

Posted 28 January 2017 in JOTS Highlights by Marianne Skogbrott Birkeland, PhD

Why do two people who experience the same trauma react completely differently? Specifically; Who recovers spontaneously from trauma, and who develops lasting symptoms of posttraumatic stress? For most people, posttraumatic stress symptoms decline gradually during the first year after the traumatic exposure. Nonetheless, a significant number of people exposed to trauma develop posttraumatic stress symptoms that last for years and require support from clinical and public health professionals.

Sleep Disturbances in Adolescent Girls with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Posted 9 December 2016 in JOTS Highlights by Janeese Brownlow, PhD & Richard Ross, MD, PhD

Disturbed sleep is a core feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sleep disturbances, in the form of chronic insomnia and recurrent nightmares, are a frequent residual complaint after successful PTSD treatment. 
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