International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies

Articles Categorized in JOTS Highlights

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Articles that appear in the Trauma Blog are from StressPoints, Journal of Traumatic Stress or web editorial contributions.

StressPoints is the award-winning online eNewsletter of ISTSS. StressPoints shares news and opinions about traumatic stress, highlights ISTSS and affiliate societies' activities and offers informational resources and feature articles of interest to the field. Access archived StressPoints articles prior to 2015.

Chronic PTSD Symptoms Over Time in Veterans

Posted 11 January 2016 in JOTS Highlights by Barbara Niles, PhD and Anica Pless Kaiser, PhD

Chronic PTSD Symptoms Over Time in Veterans
This JTS commentary discusses findings that suggest that treatments directly targeting the hyperarousal symptoms of PTSD may break the chain of symptom maintenance and may be a powerful mechanism in the treatment of chronic PTSD.

Comparison between Women-Only and Mixed-Gender Intensive PTSD Treatment for Female Veterans

Posted 2 August 2019 in JOTS Highlights, Clinical Issues and Treatment by Elina A. Stefanovics, PhD and Robert A Rosenheck, MD

Comparison between Women-Only and Mixed-Gender Intensive PTSD Treatment for Female Veterans
Women veterans diagnosed with PTSD are an especially rapidly growing subgroup of VHA patients (Washington, Davis, Der-Martirosian, & Yano, 2013), constituting 10.3% of all those diagnosed with PTSD in 2015. With the recognition that women veterans with PTSD have often experienced different types of trauma and have different needs than men, specialized intensive treatment is also offered in two specialized intensive Women’s Treatment Rehabilitation Programs (Karlin et al., 2010).

Retrospective Appraisals of Combat

Posted 4 March 2016 in JOTS Highlights by Barbara Pitts, PhD and Martin Safer, PhD

Retrospective Appraisals of Combat
A life-threatening traumatic experience can cause physical and psychological distress, but it can also be remembered with pride from having demonstrated one’s courage and abilities under severe circumstances. This JTS Commentary discusses a study investigating how combat experiences and later reflections affect reports of posttraumatic stress and depression symptoms in 324 U.S. Army medics.