International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies

Articles Published in 2015 - October

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2014 Annual Meeting Panel Paper Published: Psychotherapies for PTSD: What Do They Have in Common?

Posted 27 October 2015 in StressPoints

2014 Annual Meeting Panel Paper Published: Psychotherapies for PTSD: What Do They Have in Common?
At the 2014 ISTSS 30th Annual Meeting in Miami, Florida, the ISTSS Program Committee invited a panel investigating the similarities across psychological treatments for PTSD. It was such a successful panel that the panelists were encouraged to write up their discussions as a paper which has now been published in the European Journal of Psychotraumatology

Book Review: Evidence Based Treatments for Trauma-Related Psychological Disorders, A Practical Guide for Clinicians

Posted 27 October 2015 in StressPoints by Janet Osterman, MD

Book Review: Evidence Based Treatments for Trauma-Related Psychological Disorders, A Practical Guide for Clinicians
This textbook is truly a practical guide for clinicians with contributions from traumatic stress experts from around the world, who succinctly summarize each subject to enable the reader to develop a knowledge base that can be enriched through cited references. Basic principles constitute the first section covering epidemiology, psychological and social theories, neurobiology, and pathways that lead to physical health problems. Each of these chapters provides a pithy précis of the current state of knowledge of these core principles that establishes a solid foundation for the chapters that follow. The next short section, Part II, examines the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for the new section, Trauma-Related Disorders, and the ICD-11 diagnoses. The author contrasts the two diagnostic criteria systems, noting the increased complexity of the DSM-5 and the more streamlined ICD-1, as pertaining to PTSD.

Chronic PTSD Symptoms Over Time in Veterans

Posted 11 January 2016 in JOTS Highlights by Barbara Niles, PhD and Anica Pless Kaiser, PhD

Chronic PTSD Symptoms Over Time in Veterans
This JTS commentary discusses findings that suggest that treatments directly targeting the hyperarousal symptoms of PTSD may break the chain of symptom maintenance and may be a powerful mechanism in the treatment of chronic PTSD.

Global Perspectives: Traumatic Stress and Parent-Child Relationships

Posted 27 October 2015 in StressPoints by Elizabeth Wieling, PhD, LMFT

Global Perspectives: Traumatic Stress and Parent-Child Relationships
Persistent intergenerational transmission of family violence accompanied by harsh parenting practices and low positive involvement between parents and children is one dimension of a complex set of consequences related to traumatic stress resulting from war and organized violence on family and community functioning. Although resilience is readily seen in communities affected by mass traumas, the lasting negative effects of traumatic stress on individual and family health is ubiquitous across multiple generations, particularly in low and middle-income countries. The sequelae of maladaptive coping that often includes mental health disturbances, substance abuse and intimate partner violence, are further exacerbated by poverty and social disparities that place these families on a delicate faultline.

Life’s Work of John P. Wilson: An Overview

Posted 27 October 2015 in StressPoints by Charles R. Figley, PhD

Life’s Work of John P. Wilson: An Overview
John P. Wilson, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Cleveland State University, and an internationally known trauma psychologist died July 6, 2015, in his home in Cleveland, Ohio. The Cleveland Plain Dealer obituaryappeared a few days later. This brief article is not an obituary but, rather, a note of introduction to those who may not be familiar with his work. 

John Wilson was a pioneer trauma psychologist who became involved in helping Vietnam War veterans and was intrigued as a psychology researcher about how memories could impact trauma survivors in similar but different ways. His life and works touched thousands of people throughout the world. He was a co-founder of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) and was elected President of the Society in 1987. He was instrumental in bringing attention to Vietnam combat veterans through his innovative and pioneering work in the study and treatment of trauma.

President’s Message: The Refugee Crisis in Europe, Flooding of the U.S. East Coast and a Sneak Preview of the ISTSS 31st Annual Meeting Highlights

Posted 27 October 2015 in StressPoints by Miranda Olff, PhD

President’s Message: The Refugee Crisis in Europe, Flooding of the U.S. East Coast and a Sneak Preview of the ISTSS 31st Annual Meeting Highlights
Today’s unprecedented refugee crisis in Europe with hundreds of thousands of people who have fled their country, crossing the Mediterranean or taking exhausting land routes, emphasizes the worldwide need for knowledge about trauma and its consequences. 

Student Perspectives: Selling Yourself During a Trauma-Focused Internship or Postdoc Interview

Posted 27 October 2015 in StressPoints by Emily Voelkel, PhD

Student Perspectives: Selling Yourself During a Trauma-Focused Internship or Postdoc Interview
The Student Perspectives section of the July, 2015 issue of StressPoints discussed factors to consider when navigating your job search. If you are in the midst of applying for an internship or are currently completing an internship, it might feel overwhelming to even think about your first psychology job. If you are anything like I was, you are caught up in just obtaining the best possible trauma-focused internship and postdoctoral positions. 

Although it is possible to land a trauma-specific job if your prior training was not tailored to that area, it is certainly more difficult. In recent years, there has been a push for more specialized training. Whether or not you agree with this shift in the field, it is a factor to consider when choosing your training experiences.

Trauma and World Literature: Grief, Not Madness: Insights from Shakespeare

Posted 27 October 2015 in StressPoints by Howard Lipke, PhD

Trauma and World Literature: Grief, Not Madness: Insights from Shakespeare
In this scene Constance, learning that her son has been captured and will surely be murdered, speaks:

France: Patience, good lady! Comfort, gentle Constance!

Constance: No I defy all counsel, all redress
But that which ends all counsel, true redress,
Death, death, O amiable lovely death!
Thou odoriferous stench! Sound rottenness!
Arise forth from the couch of lasting night,
Thou hate and terror to prosperity, 
And I will kiss thy detestable bones,
And put my eyeball in thy vaulty brows
And ring these fingers with thy household worms,
And stop this gap of breath with fulsome dust,
And be carrion monster like thyself.
Come grin on me, and I will think thou smil’st
And buss thee as thy wife. Misery’s love
O, come to me!