International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies

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ISTSS Statement on Sri Lanka Bombings

Posted 25 April 2019 in News by ISTSS

The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) strongly condemns all acts of hate-based violence and terrorism such as the series of bombings at churches and hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka.

Trauma and World Literature: The Night I Learned How Not to Pray by Iris Dement

Posted 29 March 2019 in StressPoints by Howard Lipke

Ever since the release of her first album in 1992, the singer-songwriter Iris Dement has earned wide recognition and respect for her work. Her 2012 album, Sing the Delta, includes the song, The Night I Learned How Not to Pray. In the few minutes of her rendition of the song, Dement’s words, music and voice show the profound, long-lasting effects of traumatic loss, especially in childhood.
 

Trauma and Diversity: Understanding and Providing Culturally Sensitive Cognitive Processing Therapy

Posted 29 March 2019 in StressPoints by Nicholas Holder, Ryan Holliday and Amy M. Williams

Worldwide lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is estimated to be approximately 4 percent (Kessler et al., 2017), and numerous factors are associated with elevated risk of diagnosis (e.g., trauma type, military/veteran population, gender; Gates et al., 2012; Kessler et al., 2017; Lehavot et al., 2018).

Student Perspectives: Assessing and Preventing Psychology Trainee Burnout

Posted 29 March 2019 in StressPoints by Leah Taylor, MS

Trainee burnout is a concept that has been openly discussed with supervisors more during my internship training than during all of graduate school. I have been fortunate to have supervisors who ask, “Have you eaten lunch today?” “Did you get a chance to sit and conceptually think about that case?” and even, “What did you do this weekend that was fun for you?” It was in those moments it became clear: I was stuck in the graduate school mentality.

Research Methods: Preregistration Can Limit Questionable Research Practices

Posted 29 March 2019 in StressPoints by Talya Greene, PhD, MPH

Questionable Research Practices (QRPs)—a term popularized by John, Loewenstein and Prelec (2012)—have increasingly been held up as a threat to the integrity of science. In contrast to scientific fraud, QRPs are not deliberately intended to create a false impression. However, with QRPs, scientific data can be inappropriately collected, handled or presented, leading to erroneous conclusions.
 

Is and Ought in Trauma: Descriptive and Prescriptive Cognitions in Moral Injury

Posted 27 March 2019 in JOTS Highlights by Jacob Farnsworth, PhD

Moral injury refers to the “the lasting psychological, biological, spiritual, behavioral, and social impact of perpetrating, failing to prevent, or bearing witness to acts that transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations” (Litz, et al. 2009, p. 697).

Compassion Meditation for PTSD in Veterans: A Randomized Proof of Concept Study

Posted 27 March 2019 in JOTS Highlights by Ariel J Lang, PhD, MPH & Anne Malaktaris, PhD

Worldwide, complementary and alternative practices are commonly used to support physical and mental health. Meditation, in particular, is growing in popularity, and various types of meditation may be useful for addressing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Lang et al., 2012).

ISTSS Statement on New Zealand Attacks

Posted 17 March 2019 in News by ISTSS

The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) strongly condemns all acts of hate-based violence and terrorism such as the horrific mass violence perpetrated against innocent victims in two Mosques in New Zealand, and sends a deeply felt message of compassion to all of the affected families, members of the Muslim community, and the nation.
 
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